[Oeva-list] success and change

Chaz Smith chazeesmith2u at gmail.com
Thu Nov 8 11:57:37 PST 2018


Sorry to hear that you are resigning Gary but like so much that you do, it
makes perfect sense, especially given your circumstances. You have done so
much for the organization, for so long and have done it so very very well.
You have set the bar for leadership in the organization high.  Looking
forward to seeing you at some of our events during the warmer parts in the
year when you were enjoying the wonderfulness that is Oregon during its not
so dreary months.

On Thu, Nov 8, 2018, 9:15 AM Gary Graunke <gary at whitecape.org wrote:

> We have seen a lot of changes since I first joined the OEVA in 2000. I
> recall my first meeting--someone from Bonneville brought a Ford EV Ranger
> just like the one I had just ordered from Damerow Ford in Beaverton. As
> Ford pulled out of the EV business after California ZEV mandates were
> abandoned, I never took delivery of that pickup. We struggled to find
> vehicles—a ‘94 US Eletricar Chevy S-10 from ebay  became my first EV. Most
> of our group were into drag racing, and our focus was on helping members do
> conversions. We were mostly engineers and technicians, doing it mostly just
> for the joy of EV driving and fun of exhilarating acceleration.
>
>
>
> Today it is difficult to keep up with the EV offerings from almost every
> automaker. Most of us are driving store-bought EV’s, some of which are
> changing the automotive industry in a big way. In the late 70’s, I could
> not find an EV just to go 6 miles to work and back. Today some of us easily
> drive across the country in a Tesla, and Electrify America is helping all
> the others catch up with the charging networks to be able to do long
> distance travel.
>
>
>
> Along the way we found more and more reasons to go with electric vehicles.
> Yes, EV’s help our national energy security and isolate our economy from
> oil shocks and inflation as we would have wanted in the 70’s. They keep
> driving affordable not only for those that drive EV’s and those that still
> depend on stable gas prices. They solve the air pollution problems for
> urban areas. We have learned that the current transportation paradigm based
> on combustion does not scale—it produces climate change that threatens not
> only our economic and political stability, will require us to make epic
> changes in a very short time just to survive.
>
>
>
> After hurricane Katrina, when gas first hit $3.00/gallon, my manager at
> Intel saw me with my Insight EV in the parking lot. He congratulated me for
> doing well in the face of rising gas prices with my EV. I replied that I
> was not a hermit—I live in civilization, and if the people around me are
> not doing well, I will not be doing well.
>
>
>
> We transitioned from an electric car club to a non-profit, where we now
> work mostly in public education and occasionally provide input for public
> policy.
>
> While most of us know first-hand the benefits and nuances of driving
> electric, we still do not do as well as when others around us also benefit
> from following us down the path of electrifying transportation and powering
> it from renewable resources. We are happy to share our joys and even our
> missteps with others. One way to be happy is to make others around you
> happy!
>
>
>
> The kind of work we now do is very different from the earlier days. We
> have become car salespeople and EV marketers! We have been successful and
> have great joy from seeing the changes that have taken place.  But we have
> changed and must continue to change to best serve the new opportunities
> that come our way. I am grateful that we have new people who have the
> necessary backgrounds that have stepped up to lead us in this new
> environment.
>
>
>
> Today is the 50th anniversary of my 19th birthday. While I still have the
> same can-do attitude I had when I was 19, I try to gracefully accept the
> changes I need to make as I age. My third (you may recall I lost the first
> two to cancer) wife, Gina, and I have decided to become snowbirds, and will
> be down in Arizona for the winter months.
>
>
>
> So I believe it is time for me to step down as president of the OEVA. I
> will continue to support the group in any way I can, but my participation
> will necessarily be limited by my new lifestyle. There is a time to lead, a
> time to follow, and a time to get out of the way. I will be participating
> in the Phoenix area EV group activities while I’m down here.
>
>
>
> I have full faith in the others that are in leadership positions, and am
> grateful for all their work in years past. We could never have done as much
> as we have without all their time and effort.
>
>
>
> I know many of you are capable people and hope that you will step up to
> continue and expand the EV opportunities in Oregon as officers or regular
> members.
>
>
>
> With best regards,
>
>
>
> Gary Graunke
>
>
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>
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