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January 21, 2003

Swamp Coolers

Trying to explain to Kelly last night why sweat cools the body (or not, depending on humidity), I mentioned swamp coolers. I just found a site that has a rather good explanation, so here it is.

Update: To date I've received two requests for more information about swamp coolers from interested readers. To be clear, I don't have a swamp cooler and never have. The website I've pointed to is a good starting point for more information, or you can of course try Google.Good luck!

Posted by dpwakefield at January 21, 2003 06:57 PM

Comments

I live in Puerto Rico on the drier West side . I could get my own water. would a swamp-cooler be good for me???

Posted by: michael petrowski at March 23, 2003 08:25 PM

I live in an apartment with a swamp cooler (in Bakersfield, CA). I am having a hard time understanding something about how the cooler works. During the day when the outside temp is about 100, the cooler will pump in air about 82. But as it starts cooling down outside, the inside temperature doesn't fall at the same rate as during the day. At night time the air coming in is just a degree or two cooler than the outside temp. It doesn't make sense to me. I have friends who have to turn theirs either down or off when it is cooler outside because it gets too cold inside. Is there something wrong with my cooler, or is it because the cooler works best during the hot part of the day? I am just looking for an explaination so that I can either have it fixed, replaced, or just accept that that's the way it is going to be. Thanks

Posted by: Dale Reed at July 17, 2003 11:54 PM

Dale

I've updated my post to clarify that I'm not a swamp cooler wizard. Try the original link I've posted, and of course Google, as noted in the update. Thanks for asking, though. Take care!

Posted by: Don Wakefield at July 18, 2003 10:47 AM

I would guess that you are experienceing a difference in performance between day and night because of the difference in relative humidity in the outside air. An evaporative cooler can only work as long as the relative humidity is low. As night falls, and the outside air temp falls closer to the dew point, the cooler will work less efficiently, or possibly not at all. Hope this helped!

Posted by: Sean Morse at March 4, 2004 12:12 AM